AGATHE SIMON
The Conti Project

2013-present
Multidisciplinary project: performances, films, installation of 120 archives, radio play, sound installations, texts, and photographs

© Agathe Simon

The Conti Project is a tribute to the famous French-Argentine novelist Gabriela Conti (1974-2010). A legendary figure of early 21st century literature, she’s the first woman of Argentine nationality to reach the South Pole.

Created by Agathe Simon since 2013, this multidisciplinary project has included solo and collective performances (for example in Paris, Stockholm and Algiers), a documentary filmed in Antarctica, a video triptych made in the Arctic, an installation of 120 archives and documents, novels and travel stories, film photographs, a radio play on ‘France Culture’, and two 5.1 sound installations.

By developing art tributes across various territories (from the Paris’ Poetry House to an Algerian television channel, from a Swedish concert hall to a Parisian town hall, from an Italian museum to the Concordia base in Antarctica), The Conti Project questions the imaginary and critical dimensions of our time.

Agathe Simon began The Conti Project during art residencies in Antarctica and the Arctic. She has developed it in partnership with the French Institutes of Argentina, Algeria, Sweden, and Finland, the Paris’ Poetry House, French cultural radio ‘France Culture’, the ‘Cité Internationale des Arts’, the ‘Cité Internationale Universitaire de Paris’, the Concordia base (Antarctica), the University of Paris, the University of Aix-Marseille, CY Cergy Paris University, the Argentine Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Festival of Contemporary Art Nocturne Halifax (Canada), the Swedish Arts Grants Committee, Audiorama & Modern Dance Theater (Sweden), the Visby International Centre for Composers (Sweden), the polar sailing boat Atka (Arctic), the Town Hall of the 10th arrondissement of Paris, the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Udine (Italy), the CDG gallery in Rabat (Morocco), the University of Science and Technology of Oran (Algeria), the French Institute of Constantine (Algeria), the ‘Médiathèque Musicale de Paris’ (France), the Tourism and Travel Library, the Hélène Berr Library, and the Alfred Musset Library, the Aarni, Huuto and Kanneltalo Galleries (Finland), the Spazioersetti Gallery (Italy).

Special thanks: Djamel Mékarnia, Andrea Juan, Victor Boyarsky, Jean-Yves Langlais, François Bernard.